Wherry Maud Trust Lunch – Saturday 17th February 2018

Acle Bridge Inn was the venue for our winter members’ lunch and 27 people came along. At the pub there is a newly refurbished back room with large television that enabled Martin, our archivist, to show photos throughout the meal.members lunch 2018
It was pleasing to welcome a few new members as well as those who have supported Maud for many years. There was a good buzz of conversation throughout and memories were tested by the short quiz on Maud’s history. Not surprisingly the winners were old friends of Maud, although no team got full marks and the tie breaker was not needed.

The facilities, the food and the service could not be faulted. All excellent and thanks to Phil, Vanessa and their team.

Work Parties on Maud

In 2018 so far we have had two working parties. The first was on Saturday 3 Feb when 11 people attended. A whole list of jobs were tackled and there were two major ones:

  • launch of the new tender “Silver Star” and bringing her round to Womack
  • putting up two storage chests next to Maud so that we can clear spare items out of the hold, give us more space and make it look much tidier.
Work Party
Photo by Linda Pargeter

The second working party took place on Monday 19 Feb and 8 people came for all or part of the day. Again lots of jobs were tackled and Mike and Peter concentrated on preparation so that we are ready to paint when the temperature has risen a bit. Of special note was the installation by Martin of an LED lighting panel above the galley. The lights are run from a battery and should last for 8 hours. Lighting will be much appreciated when preparing drinks and washing up in low light conditions.

Work Party
Photo by Martin Carruthers

Another job that hadn’t been done for some years was a complete re-paint of the name boards. Nicki and Roger did a splendid job on those, taking them home to finish the lettering. No, they haven’t been stolen and will be put back on the occasion of the next working party on 10 March.

Vanishing Sail Film at The Cut

We were fortunate that the weather that evening was good, al- though cold. No snow, and that was the important thing. The arts centre at Halesworth is outside our usual area of operation but for most members only an average 45 minute drive. It was the only venue we could find for a winter screening. From the Broads area there are two routes that you can take, via Norwich and via Great Yarmouth. Unfortunately there was an accident on the A47 road to Yarmouth that evening. One of our trustees was caught up in the resulting traffic jam and had to turn round and use the alternative route. Having planned to arrive at the venue early he arrived with only a few minutes to spare. We conclude that others may have had similar problems and may have given up and gone home.

The film was publicised widely by the arts centre and by ourselves. We emailed our members and others, and in the process made useful contacts at sailing clubs down the coast from Great Yarmouth to Suffolk. Some people did attend as a result of publicity from their sailing club.

It was fascinating to see a beautiful sailing vessel constructed on a beach next to the sea, built out of mostly local materials and with the only plans being a half model. Many of the boat builders in the Caribbean are descended from Scottish settlers who passed on their skills to the local population and inter-married with them. Surnames such as Compton bear witness to this. We have to remember that when Maud was built on the bank of the Yare at Reedham there would also have been few plans and the hull of the boat would have been set up mainly by eye.

Vanishing Sail

A total of 62 people attended and all agreed that it had been a pleasant evening. The film ended with wonderful footage of the Classic Sail Regatta on Antigua. After all that sunshine it was quite a shock to come out of the cinema to a dark, cold winter’s evening.

Here is a “thank you” from one of our members:

“Hi, we really enjoyed the film, it brought back memories as I trained as a boatbuilder and worked in Greece in primitive circumstances, thanks for arranging it”.

We will be contacting Indian Creek Films with a view to arranging another screening of the film at an alternative venue nearer The Broads.

WMT Archive Afternoon

On Saturday 18th November 2017

historic wherry picture

a Wherry Maud Trust Archive Afternoon
was held at Acle Church Hall.

Approximately 33 members and non members attended and during the afternoon had the opportunity to listen to presentations given by Geoff Doggett, Thelma Waller, Linda Pargeter and Martin Carruthers. The presentations were accompanied by slide shows.

Geoff’s talk touched on many aspects of early transport in the Waveney Valley and suggested further topics to investigate regarding water transport. His slides of photographs from the Hobrough collection in the Bridewell Museum were particularly interesting. J.S. Hobrough, the river contractor, had a fleet of wherries and owned Maud between 1919 and 1940. The Hobrough collection comprises a unique collection of photographs detailing the projects that the firm undertook using largely manual labour and machinery that looks primitive to our modern eyes.

Linda spoke about the art of the Rev David Poole, a royal portrait artist, who had collaborated with his friend Ted Ellis, the well known local naturalist, and had produced beautifully illustrated books on the Broads area. Sketches of groups of wherries were shown and Thelma read a Ted Ellis poem about the last days of the trading wherries. The poem was actually dedicated by Ted Ellis to J.S. Hobrough.

After tea, coffee and delicious cakes baked by members, there were two further talks.

Linda gave an outline of what is known about skippers of Maud and appealed for help in tracing descendants of some of them. She showed photographs of a few and gave a list of names that need further investigation.

The final talk was given by Martin, the Wherry Maud Trust volunteer archivist. He has been cataloguing and scanning documents, postcards, photos and diaries. He showed a selection of picture postcards mostly showing wherries, and then drew members’ attention to the social history of the messages on the back of the cards. One postcard, dated 1909, tells us that on 25 Oct 1909 King Edward VII visited Norwich, accompanied by his Secretary of State for War, Lord Haldane.  Martin did some research and found that the purpose of the visit was to lay a foundation stone for an extension of the Norfolk and Norwich hospital. But why was he accompanied by the Secretary of State for War? One question always leads to another.

Maud is in commission again

After a successful re-launch in heavy rain on Friday 8th September the trustees of Maud are pleased to report that Maud is ready to sail again from the Norfolk Wherry Trust base at Womack.
On Sunday 17th September re-rigging was completed under the watchful eye of skipper Kim Dowe.
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Kim and his crew then set out from Burgh Castle to return to Ludham. Unfortunately conditions in the shape of a head wind for the first part of the journey across Breydon and later very light winds prevented raising sail and the whole trip was done with the tender pushing. Maud arrived at Acle Bridge just as it got dark.

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On the following day Ian Scowen skippered Maud, again under engine, from Acle Bridge to Womack.
This coming Sunday morning, 8th October, Maud will be making a couple of short trips from Womack and we are hoping for favourable winds so that we can say that Maud is actually sailing again after the refit.

Thank you to our new member Sue Grief for these superb photos she took of events on the 17th September.

Linda Pargeter
3 October 2017

Wherry Maud Appeal 2017 Results Update

Wherry Maud Trust final report on Maud’s
Three Yearly Out-of-the-water Maintenance
and Update on results of the 2017 Appeal


 Maud's Re-Launch

Maud has been re-launched – see the above photo by Martin Curruthers. She returned to Womack on 18 September under motor and we plan to sail her on the Thurne and Bure this coming Sunday 8th October.

Trustees are now closing the appeal:

  • Further to our last report in which we declared our intention to close the appeal once Maud was back in commission, the appeal is now closed.
  • We last reported that £3000 had been raised. The final total is £3830!
  • We are still not in a position to confirm the final total spent but should be able to do that shortly.
  • The extra money raised will enable trustees to start building a fund for the higher costs expected for the next two refits in 2020 and 2023.
  • Grateful thanks goes to those members who gave their time freely to minimise labour costs. Trustees estimate that around 240 hours of volunteer labour was used to complete the project.

Last but not least, grateful thanks for the efficiency and skill of the two-man team from Colin Buttifant Boatbuilders and of the staff of Goodchild Marine. Always good to know that Maud is in safe hands.

Trustees of Wherry Maud
1 October 2017

Wherry Maud Trust 2017 Appeal

Maud is fready for re-launch
Maud is ready for re-launch

The Trustees are delighted to report as follows:

  • Target was set to fund an estimated mix of materials and to supplement funds already in hand.
  • The amount we hoped to raise was £2,200. Thanks to the generosity of a few individuals we have exceeded the target.
  • As at the end of July we had raised only £20, by the 15th of August the figure had risen to £895 and currently, due mainly to one donation, we have raised £3000!
  • The appeal will close once Maud is successfully in commission again.
  • The extra money raised has been allocated for the purchase of fastenings for the next phase of major maintenance in 2020.
  • The final total spend cannot be given until bills are received but will be in the region of £12500.
  • You may have seen from reports in the press that the Trust now has a 6-year maintenance plan. Longer lengths of oak planking will be replaced in 2020 and 2023. Fund raising for that work will be ongoing.

Trips in June and July 2017

June and July seem a long way behind us now, even though it is only early August. Maud’s 2017 sailing season will shortly be almost at an end due to three-yearly out-of-the-water maintenance starting on August 7th.
I promised some pictures of members performing crewing tasks and here they are. This time the photos are sent in by our members
A winch party on 3rd June paying serious attention to lowering sail. Note the new halyard (rope) on the winch barrel, and the way the crew are concentrating on the job in hand.

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photo by Martin Carruthers

 On the 18th June trip from Acle Bridge to Hardley, Neil Thomas (trustee and trainee skipper) took the helm while Kim Dowe (skipper) had a rest.

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photo by Sue Hines

And on the 30th June a winch party admired the way the halyard has finished in the ideal place after raising sail. The idea is to finish hoisting with the rope on the bare barrel of the winch, making hoisting easier as those hoisting get more tired.

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photo by John Cook

Also on 30th June during the journey from Hardley to Beccles, skipper Ian Scowen (left) gave member Ellie Rockley a chance to experience helming Maud.

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photo by John Cook

And then it was Steve Hiscox’s turn, with Ian Scowen still supervising of course. Herringfleet Mill on the Waveney in the background.

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photo by John Cook

On the 29 July trip from Frostbites at Thorpe down river back to Hardley Mill, Haydn was having his first try at quanting Maud. Haydn joined as trainee crew this year and has already earnt his “Gem driver” badge. Perhaps someone else took a better photo?

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photo by Linda Pargeter

Another volunteer job is to take people out in The Gem (Maud’s tender) to get a good view of Maud under sail and take photos. Here, on 29 July, Glyn Pugh is driving and Ruth is enjoying the view.

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photo by Linda Pargeter

Finally, a group photo taken at the end of our very memorable trip from Acle Bridge to Hardley Mill. The trip was very memorable because Betsy (extreme right) had come from Florida especially to take her second trip on Maud and see windmills on the lower Bure and Yare. More about her visit in the August newsletter.

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photo from Betsy Hurst’s camera

Written by Linda Pargeter, Trustee of Wherry Maud Trust, 4 August 2017.

Trips in April and May 2017

People enjoy a trip on Maud in lots of different ways, and I hope the following will give you the flavour of our trips so far this year. Next time I write I will choose photos that illustrate other more serious ways of enjoying ourselves, watching the wildlife and learning about sailing a trading wherry.

With the exception of the final photo, all the pictures were taken on my mobile phone.

Here is the chilled out way, best suited to a sunny day :

Relaxing on a sunny day

And then there’s eating cakes, even better when on board boat and in good company :

Eating cakes!
Seeing the wherry’s rig from an unusual angle :

Maud's rig from an unusual angle

Sheltering from a chilly breeze :

Shelter in a chilly breeze

Or even helming the wherry under the watchful eye of Neil Thomas :

Neil Thomas at the helm

It has been a wonderful start to the season and we hope for many more trips with a happy group photo at the end just like this one :

Happy Cew
Picture by Chris Tovey

Written by Linda Pargeter, Trustee of Wherry Maud, May 21 2017.

 

Joint Event with the Wind Energy Museum – October 9th 2016

On May 15th we had had our first joint event with the Wind Energy Museum at Repps, offering a unique experience to a group of people to learn about different uses of wind power. That day was a great success and so we arranged a repeat on Sunday 9 October. The morning was spent touring the museum and having an early lunch there. Afterwards the group walked to Thurne Mill which was opened for them to view. Then they were able to step on board Maud and sail with us up the Bure towards St Benet’s Abbey and back.

All trips are different and volunteer skippers and crew enjoy meeting the members. This trip was made memorable because we had on board one of the people, John Henson, who shaped Maud’s mast in the mid-1990s at the International Boatbuilding Training Centre at Lowestoft. Here we see him at the helm in a shower of rain. That’s skipper Kim standing on deck next to him.

Skipper Kim with John Henson
Photo by Linda Pargeter

We had a shower or two of rain but dried off quickly in between. There are new pics in the Happy Faces photo gallery that show some of our cheery new members on board. New and old members , skipper Kim and crew members Martin and Linda were enjoying their sail so much that all agreed to stay out later than planned, arriving at Repps Staithe at around 6pm. The crew then returned Maud to her base in the Norfolk Wherry Trust boat shed by around 7pm, getting thoroughly wet in a heavy downpour on the way.

Maud at Repps Staithe
Photo by Linda Pargeter

Reviving Old Skills

During the weekend of 10/11 September 2016 Maud made history.

Do you know anyone who has witnessed a wherry being loaded in the traditional way using her mast as a crane*?
Well, now there are some Heritage Open Day visitors to Thurne who have seen that skill demonstrated.

Bystanders watching cargo being loaded : Sept 2016
Bystanders watching cargo being loaded.

The crew removed some of Maud’s hatches and stacked them either end of the hold, then they lowered the gaff and sail down onto them. That left an area of the hold open for loading and unloading. The mast was then lowered to a suitable angle for lifting from the centre of the hold.

Lifting cargo out of Maud's hold : Sept-2016
Lifting cargo out of Maud’s hold.

One of the crew operated the winch and heavy sacks and a large bag of reed were (almost) effortlessly transferred from wherry to bank and back again throughout the day.

Loading cargo at Thurne on 11 Sept 2016
Loading cargo at Thurne on 11 Sept 2016.

It was skipper Kim Dowe who taught the crew how it was done in preparation for the event. He learnt his skills from his father Vic who was a wherryman and who sailed Albion in the 1950s.

Skyscape with Maud's mast lifting gaff : Sept 2016
Skyscape with Maud’s mast lifting gaff.

*Note that the block at the mast head is suspended from the crane iron.